When, in April 1917, the United States declared war on Germany, the Air Service of the American Army, then called the Aviation

Section, Signal Corps, had a strength only 65 officers and about 1,100 men. It possessed about 200 training aircraft, but not a single

one of a type fit for service on the actual battle front nor were any airplanes of this type being manufactured in the United States.

There was no existing foundation of practical experience upon which could be based plans for the development of an overseas

force and for the placing of an aerial army in the air. Seventeen months later, on November 11, 1918, in the Air Service, American 

Expeditionary Forces there were 7,738 officers and 70,769 men.


December 1918  Col. Edgar S. Gorrell AEF

Asst. Chief of Staff to Maj. General Mason M. Patrick, Chief of Air Service AEF




AIRCRAFT: SALMSON 2A2 - DEHAVILLAND DH-4 - SPAD S. X111


2d Air Instructional Center - Tours

Ourches Aerodrome - France

90th Aero Squadron - Salmson 2A2

Delouze Aerodrome


   For the purposes of this website, we have chosen those Aero Squadrons of the AEF that would go on to serve with what would

become the 3rd Attack / 3rd Bombardment Groups.



8th Aero Squadron

12th Aero Squadron

13th Aero Squadron

26th Aero Squadron

90th Aero Squadron

104th Aero Squadron

279th Aero Squadron - Redesignated 5th Air Park in 1918



8th Aero Squadron

12th Aero Squadron

13th Aero Squadron

26th Aero Squadron

90th Aero Squadron

104th Aero Squadron

12th Aero Salmson 2A2   Courtesy of Tom Ives

13th Aero Squadron SPAD XIII   Cortesy of Charles Hinton

8th Aero Squadron DH-4  Courtesy of William J. Swain

Dehavilland DH-4

Mechanic in Biddle SPAD  Courtesy of Scott Lindley

Charles Biddle SPAD XII
8th Aero Squadron
8th Aero Squadron Mascot
Blackie
Lt. Claude S. Garrett
8th Aero Squadron
Capt. Sheldon H. Wheeler
8th Aero Squadron
12th Aero Squadron